Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Young Political Leaders and Policy Experts Join IRI to Observe Tunisia’s Election

With much focus, and concern, put on the low youth turnout in Tunisia’s elections (see op-ed on ForeignPolicy.com by IRI president Mark Green), IRI has brought young leaders in European and U.S. politics to be a part of its international election observation mission.

IRI brought these accomplished young people to Tunisia to try and better understand why young Tunisians feel so alienated from their country’s politics and why they aren’t voting.

Led by Luís Vales, a young member of the Portuguese Parliament and deputy secretary general of the Social Democratic Party, the delegation includes:

  • Chris Clark the mayor of Mountain View, California, who, at 31, is one of the youngest mayors in the United States;
  • Charlotte Florance, research associate at the Heritage Foundation’s Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy;
  • Andrianos Giannou, 29, of Romania is vice president of the Youth of the Democratic-Liberal Party;
  • Vincent Harris, founder and chief executive officer of Harris Media;
  • Riccardo Pozzi of Italy, vice president of Youth of the European People’s Party;
  • Jess Yescalis, 43, who is the owner and president of Yescalis Campaign Strategies in Arizona.
Mayor Clark looks at voter education materials.

The delegation also includes some of IRI’s young leaders including:

  • Scott Mastic, director of IRI’s Middle East and North Africa programs;
  • Andy Yates, resident program officer in Jordan;
  • Ann-Robin Anthony, deputy director of IRI’s Women’s Democracy Network;
  • Ashleigh Whelan, deputy director of IRI’s Democratic Governance programs;
  • David Sands, program officer overseeing IRI’s Egypt program;
  • Liz Lewis, an evaluation officer at IRI;
  • Luke Waggoner, resident program officer in Tunisia;
  • Nat Breeding, resident program officer in Tunisia; 
  • Thibau Muzergues, resident country director in Slovakia; and
  • Myself, if 44 can still be counted as young.  It can, can’t it?
Posted by

Lisa Gates

Director of Communications